New Database: Lansingburgh (NY) Marriages

Bill McGrath, project coordinator for the Troy (N.Y.) Irish Genealogy Society, announces another project that digitizes a valuable resource compiled decades ago:

Marriage Notices Appearing in Lansingburgh Newspapers 1787 – 1895

This is an index to 2,712 marriage notices published in ten different Lansingburgh, New York newspapers from 1787 to 1895, including 5,424 names. The original index was created by Troy Public Library staff in 1938-39. The TIGS scan of this book makes these records available online.

Lansingburgh newspapers reflected in the index include American Spy, Federal Herald, Lansingburgh Advertiser, Lansingburgh Chronicle, Lansingburgh Courier, Lansingburgh Democrat, Lansingburgh Gazette, Lansingburgh Daily Gazette, Lansingburgh Times and Northern Centinel. The majority of the notices pre-date New York State’s 1880 law mandating civil registration of vital events, so this index is extremely important for anyone seeking evidence of early-era marriages.

Most entries show:

  • Name of bride and groom;
  • Residence of bride and groom;
  • Date of marriage;
  • Names of newspapers reporting the marriage;
  • Date, newspaper name and column number where notice appeared.

Unsurprisingly, Lansingburgh is most often mentioned, with 1,708 entries. But more than two hundred other cities, towns and villages throughout New York State are represented, along with 33 other U.S. states and five foreign countries. (More than 1200 names gave no indication of residence.) Here are the localities other than Lansingburgh with the highest numbers:

Troy 483
Waterford 150
Schaghticoke 149
Pittstown 144
Albany 117
New York City 93
Brunswick 77
Cohoes 74
Hoosick 43
Cambridge 42
Stillwater 28
Easton 26
Halfmoon 24
West Troy 22

(And if you, like me, have ancestors in West Troy, it’s worth noting that in addition to the 22 West Troy entries in the chart above, there are 12  for Watervliet, the name under which West Troy was known from 1896 on.)

As McGrath notes, Troy ranked fourth among U.S. cities in per-capita wealth at the time of the 1840 federal census, and the breadth of these marriage notices no doubt reflects this area’s role as an economic magnet in the first half of the 19th century.

This latest database joins a constellation of projects on the TIGS website containing nearly 300,000 entries, reflecting people of both Irish and non-Irish descent. Again, if you have ancestry in the Capital District of New York State and you haven’t found the Troy Irish Genealogy site yet, you are missing out!

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