Sentimental Sunday: Anything f’Thanksgiving, Continued

Back in 2010, I expounded upon a long-ago Brooklyn custom in which kids went door-to-door on Thanksgiving, asking for treats. As I wrote then, I once suspected my Greenpoint-raised mom of making this up purely to mess with our childish minds.

But the custom was quite real, as readers have since noted. “Anything f’Thanksgiving” has generated some lovely comments. As they show, not only did this custom extend beyond the borders of Greenpoint, it remains a bright memory in the minds of former city children.

Most recently, Lola from Queens writes:

On Thanksgiving morning, the children dressed up in costumes to honor the people that they admired. No Hobos Allowed! My younger brother dressed up as a policeman. I dressed up as a fine lady, like my mother, so did my twin sister. One would say “Anything for Thanksgiving”? as you rang the door bell.

And here’s Judy from the Bronx:

Anything for Thanksgivin. Absolutely, We lived on 162nd Street in the Bronx in a 10 story building and we would dress up and go into the alleys and beg. People would throw pennies out of their windows. Some would wrap the pennies in bits of newspaper so they didn’t bounce all over the place. We also, filled socks with flour and tried to hit each other.

(Hey, Judy, a belated thanks for remembering the flour-filled socks. My mother HATED those as much as she liked the dressing up.)

Speaking of which, John from Greenpoint also recalls the socks, but as a Halloween high point:

We would fill womens’ old stockings with flour and hit each other with them..Lots of fun.

I think I’ll move on, so as not to give the youth of today any bright ideas. The point is, John and my mom might have differed on the socks part, but not on the fun.

Another, larger point to be made about Anything f’Thanksgiving:

For a lot of people, the terms “city” and “folk tradition” are incompatible. What an error this is, as the shared memories demonstrate so strongly. From the bottom of my heart, I thank all of you who reached out to explain and expand upon this custom and where it took place. What a beautiful example of the lost flavors and colors of city life, long ago.

[UPDATE: Helen in her comment below asks: Did kids dress up on both Halloween and Thanksgiving? My short answer: I’m not sure. The longer answer, according to my late Mom: Thanksgiving was when she dressed up and went door-to-door; Halloween was for mischief-making, such as chalking people’s doors and clouting them with the infamous flour-filled socks. She did not specify whether one dressed up for the mischief making. So, please tell us, anyone who remembers — did kids dress up on both days?]

And now, for all of us Anything f’Thanksgiving fans, Mr. Robert Martens has shared a remarkable treat — 1940s home movie footage taken by his grandfather, Gus, in College Point, Queens.

Be sure to read Mr. Martens’ accompanying description to his video, where he describes his family’s memories of the tradition in greater detail.  He thinks Anything f’Thanksgiving might have died out because city residents who had survived the Great Depression became understandably allergic to the idea of their children dressing up as beggars and seeking treats door to door. I think the ways mass media smoothed out and homogenized pop culture after World War II didn’t do the custom any favors, either.

But whatever your theory, it seems clear that the ragamuffins of Thanksgiving went away sometime in the 1950s, so this crystal-clear footage is now a precious reminder of lost era.

Happy trick-or-treating, whenever you do it.

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5 Comments on “Sentimental Sunday: Anything f’Thanksgiving, Continued”

  1. Linda Bonavita says:

    What a fun tradition ! Too bad it no longer exists….we kids of the 50′s had the best of times.

    The movie “Meet Me in St. Louis” with Judy Garland has a Halloween scene where one kid rings a crotchety old neighbor’s doorbell then throws flour in his face when he answers (I think I have that right).

    Thanks for this, Liz !

  2. Helen says:

    Just checked with my 80+-year-old mother-in-law who told me that as a girl she’d travel from New Jersey to her relatives’ house in the Bronx for Thanksgiving. Her cousins would indeed get dressed up “like Halloween” and go out. My mother-in-law, the Jersey girl, did not partake. When I asked her if the Bronx cousins dressed up at Halloween also, she said, “No, they didn’t go out on Halloween.”

  3. Helen says:

    So kids dressed up at Halloween AND Thanksgiving?


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