Links, April 19, 2010

Today in history: In 1934, Shirley Temple appeared in her first movie, Stand up And Cheer! It would be more accurate to say “starred in her first feature,” since Temple appeared in a series of “Baby Burlesks” shorts and bit parts prior to …

What did you say? Something else happened today? Yes indeed, today in history the shot heard ’round the world was fired at Lexington, Massachusetts, igniting the American Revolution. The event was dramatized by re-enacters at dawn today, as it is every year. Here is a rundown of other notable events on this day (or any day) in history.

Today this happened, plus Shirley Temple made her first picture. Priorities, priorities.

More history lessons: I am indebted to my brother Jim, a fan of what I like to call Extreme History, for pointing out this news item on the Donner Party, famous for their  ill-fated trek westward and subsequent creative cooking experiments. Apparently their menu was not all it was cracked up to be. Jim is very disappointed.

Genealogy and Macintosh: James Tanner at Genealogy’s Star posted last week about why he does his genealogy on Macs. I’ve been a Mac person myself  since the get-go (minus a brief, disastrous fling involving a double-disk-drive Radio Shack PC). Still, I roll my eyes at the mindless cheerleading that often comes with the territory.  Which is why I love Mr. Tanner’s reasonable but positive commentary about what makes Macs and iPhones great tools for genealogists. (He is also noodling around with the iPad but thinks the jury is still out on its usefulness to his genealogy work.)

Larceny at the archives: I’ve posted before about ways to treat your library right, especially when you’re working in the local history archives. It did not occur to me to include the rule “Don’t Steal The Holdings.” However, this is just what happened to the entire vintage sheet music collection at a suburban Chicago library. The story has a happy ending — the unknown thief returned all 327 pieces of the collection  to the police. The accompanying note said only: “I am sorry.”

Better cemetery photos: Tombstone photography can be a nervewracking experience, especially if you are making a special visit to a distant cemetery and it’s a cloudy day. This article gives some helpful tips on making the most of your lighting to get a clear-cut view of the headstone’s lettering, even on an iffy day. I definitely appreciate the advice.

Any exciting news of your own? Share it in the comments, if you like. Enjoy the week!

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